Culture & History
 
  News & Events:  
 
Historical Events
  The Shoshone Conversion to Mormonism
  NW Shoshone Corinne Settlement
  Harvest & Diet Homesteading
  Clothing Washakie
  Shelter Washakeie School Day
  Customs World War II
  Fur Trappers Washakie Farm Sold
  Pioneer Movement Federal Recognition
 

Bear River Massacre

Massacre Site Saved
  Treaty of Box Elder References
  Promontory Point  
 
 

The Shoshone

  At the time of major white penetration of the Great Basin and the Snake River areas in the 1840s, there were seven distinct Shoshone groups. The Eastern Shoshone, numbering about 2,000 under their famous Chief Washakie, occupied the region from the Wind River Mountains to Fort Bridger and astride the Oregon Trail; their descendants today live on the Wind River Reservation. Two other divisions having similar cultures were the Goshute Shoshone and the Western Shoshone. The former, about 900 in number, lived in the valleys and mountains west and southwest of Great Salt Lake, with the remnants of their bands located in and around the small settlement of Ibapah, Utah, today. A much more numerous people, perhaps 8,000 strong, the Western Shoshone occupied what is today northern and western Nevada. There were as many as eleven major bands distributed from the present Utah-Nevada border to Winnemucca on the west. Their descendants today live on the Duck Valley Reservation or scattered around the towns of northern Nevada from Wells to Winnemucca.
The four remaining groups of Shoshone are usually listed under the general name of the "Northern Shoshone." One of these groups, the Fort Hall Shoshone of about 1,000 people, lived together with a band of about 800 Northern Paiute known in history as the Bannock. A second division of Shoshone, the Lemhi, numbering some 1,800 people, ranged from the Beaverhead country in southwestern Montana westward to the Salmon River area. In western Idaho, along the Boise and Bruneau rivers, a third section of about 600 Shoshone followed a life centered on salmon as their basic food. Finally, the fourth and final division of 1,500 people, the Northwestern Shoshone, resided in the valleys of northern Utah--especially Weber Valley and Cache Valley--and along the eastern and northern shores of Great Salt Lake, and southern Idaho.
 
 
  Brigham Tribal Office
707 N. Main Street
Brigham City, UT 84302
Phone: 800-310-8241
Local: 435.734.2286 | Fax: 435.734.0424
Pocatello Tribal Office
353 East Lander
Pocatello, ID 83201
Phone: 208-478-5712
Fax: 208.478.5713
 
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